From the Files of The Hurleyville Sentinel: June 2016

FROM THE FILES OF THE HURLEYVILLE SENTINEL

Compiled by Sullivan County Historian John Conway
June 21, 1916
POST OFFICE ENLIGHTENED
The post office is now equipped with electric lights which makes a great improvement.

June 28, 1916
NEW CONSTRUCTION
Jos. Brenner & Son have broken ground for a new building and we understand they contemplate putting in a mill with electric power.
The stone road between Hurleyville and Loch Sheldrake had been repaired and mow the town road machinery goes to Mountaindale.
A LONG DAY’S JOURNEY
John Knapp came down from the Columbia Monday in his car and boarded the nine o’clock train for Liberty telling those here he would be back on the 10:17 in time to take them to the house. Well, he came on the 10:17 all right and when it went through here about 50 miles an hour he sung out the window, “I’ll be back on No. 1.” Well, No. 1 now goes through faster than that, but that wasn’t the worst of it – the train he was on never stopped until it reached Middletown, so he had quite some excursion, reaching home on the 7:43 that evening.

June 11, 1937
ROSS ADMITS MURDER GUILT, HALTS TRIAL
Mischa Ross, formerly of Sullivan County, pleaded guilty Monday to second degree murder in connection with the death of Tania Lubova, night club violinist, killed with a hammer in a Times Square studio April eighteenth. He will be sentenced June twenty-first.
The thirty-one-year old Broadway booking agent, who kept a Sunday afternoon tryst with the twenty-four-year old violinist and beat her to death when she resisted his advances, faces a sentence of twenty years to life.
Ross had been arrested at the Mountaindale home of his estranged wife the day after the murder.
LOCAL GIRLS WIN PRIZE
The Hurleyville Girls Sextette, reduced to a quintet by the illness of their soprano, Mollie Wood, on Sunday night was awarded second prize in the fourth annual Sullivan County Amateur Contest held at the Young’s Gap Hotel in Parksville.
A large group of performers competed for honors before an audience of nearly five hundred people. The Young Folk’s League of Sullivan County sponsored the show, which was followed by a dance.
David Leider of Monticello, a singer, was awarded first prize; the Hurleyville girls second; and Edward Hones, Roscoe cornet player, was third. Prizes were $10, $5, and $3.
BETROTHED COUPLE FETED BY FRIENDS
Miss Sarah Hillman and Herbert Billowitz, both of Hurleyville, who plan to be married next Saturday, June 19, were honored by their friends on Wednesday evening when Miss Hillman was tendered a surprise shower at the Shady Nook Country Club and Mr. Billowitz was given a stag party in his honor at the Morningside Hotel.
About sixty attended the shower; about fifty attended the stag party.

June 18, 1937
NEWS AND PERSONAL NOTES
Mrs. George Lounsbury has returned to her home here after spending the past four weeks in the Robert packer Hospital at Sayre, PA, where she submitted to a serious operation. Her present condition is said to be favorable.
Max Tennanbaum has opened a grocery and appetizer shop in the Kurland store for the summer months.
Miss Marjorie Prince has returned to Hurleyville for the summer where she plans to conduct a beauty shop at one of the local hotels.
FEDUN – BAGAILUK
Miss Sophie Bagailuk and Harry Fedun, both of Hurleyville, were united in marriage in a beautiful wedding ceremony performed at the Thompsonville Ukrainian Church on Sunday, June 13 at noon. The ceremony was performed by Reverend Theo. Yaworsky in the presence of nearly 200 friends and relatives.
A reception was held at the Garden House in Hurleville. The newlyweds are spending a honeymoon at Niagara Falls.

June 25, 1937

STUDENTS GRADUATED FROM LOCAL SCHOOL WITH HIGH HONORS
Thirteen graduates of the Hurleyville High School received diplomas at the Commencement exercises held at the school auditorium on Saturday evening while on the previous evening fifteen diplomas were distributed to graduates of the grade school.
Leo Salon, salutatorian of the high school, enjoyed the distinction of winning four awards, the first for 100% excellence in Intermediate Algebra, a five dollar cash prize donated by Lazurus I. Levine for the highest mark in American History, another for being chosen the outstanding boy in the class, and the fourth, a prize donated by Philip Krukin, Monticello jeweler, for the highest Regents average.
Miss Dorothy Osdoby delivered the valedictory address.
William G. Birmingham, Liberty attorney and president of the Sullivan County Bar Association, was guest speaker. He stressed the value of the Constitution, and urged the graduates and the audience to cherish the freedom which they now possess.